Posts tagged “walking picture

Flat cap and turn-ups

An unidentified walking picture [WP867], it looks like the gent is out for a brisk constitutional on his own. It could be mid-1940s, but his outfit is pretty timeless! Pipe clamped firmly in mouth he’s not really looking at the camera but must surely have been aware of what was going on. The auto card number matches some from Margate walkie firms which might be a clue, again the H identifies the photographer to the darkroom staff back at base.

WP867-margate

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Waterloo walkie

This walkie [WP868] would be a hard one to locate but for two reasons; first I recognise it as Waterloo Road in Blackpool, having helped identify some walkies taken there in the past. And the lady in the centre has written “Blackpool June 1950” on the back in biro!

Walking picture, Waterloo Road, Blackpool June 1950. Mother, daughter on tricycle
It pre-dates the other Waterloo Road walkies (which you can see on the site here) by only a year or two, but were taken on a different camera.
Which just leaves us with one last puzzle, who is in the family group? I assume the lady on the far left is just caught up in the picture but perhaps the lad on the right (with his beach spade) is related.
They may be locals, it’s hard to imagine they would have travelled far with the tricycle which the little girl is understandably distracted by.


Ladies and gent…

Gentleman and four ladies, walking, 1940s

Two hard to identify walkies here (WP865, 866), but the Gentleman in the middle seems to be happy escorting the same four then five ladies around, twice on the same holiday. He’s even taken his tweed jacket AND overcoat off in the second frame! The prints are small, only around 3″ by 2″, and are quite soft. There is very little in the way of buildings to help tell us where it was taken, and only a pencil reference number on the back which suggests a small business.
The single decker bus might be a clue to an expert so let me know if you recognise it or the town, and I would imagine this to be late 1940s from the big shoulders on the left hand dress.

Gentleman and five ladies, walking, 1940s


Grand Parade

Skegness-grand-parade

The walking picture firm of Wrates are covered on the site, but this seems to be quite an early hand numbered example of their work as the back print does not mention their Harrington Road studio or the Pier kiosk. It turned up recently, I would think it dates from the 1920s and shows two elderly but imposing ladies pottering past the entrance to the Tower Gardens on The Grand Parade in Skegness one morning. They are wearing fashions from an earlier to the photographer era, which perhaps make it look even older than it is. Despite their seeming indifference they must have taken a ticket a few seconds later and gone back to the kiosk in the afternoon to buy the print!

skegness-Wrates-postcard-back


Blackpool girls

Blackpool-walkie-snaps

From one of the three Blackpool piers (my money is on the South Pier), another walkie from Blackpool company Walkie Snaps. This is a pre-War example, identified by the film sprockets showing on the right hand side, their layout at the time. The print is 3″ by 4″ approx and would have been a strip of three. The two girls are enjoying an early afternoon stroll judging from the shadows, other holiday-makers are taking a post-lunch rest in the shelter on the left!
There is some history about Walkie Snaps on the site (although for such a prolific walkie firm not much is yet known) and more examples of their photos in the book Go Home On A Postcard.


From Workington

workington

This walking picture is a long way technically from being a great photograph but it captures a tiny moment in time so well; two young women with a new baby out walking with their pram on a blustery day, you would think it was just taken by a friend – except it has the giveaway print reference number on the back. One of the women has written their home address on the back, 3 Howgill Cottages, Low Road. This is a rural road in Brigham outside Workington in Cumbria, but I cannot locate the house. Not do we know for sure where it was taken, though one of the North West resorts seems likely, perhaps Morecambe (could that be the Midland Hotel – 1933 – going up in the distance?).
Despite the poor print, what seems to be double exposure, chemical marks and the lack of detail (it’s only 2″ by 3″ but may have been one of a pair), they clearly enjoyed having it taken and bought the print as a souvenir of the day.


Busy Aberdeen

aberdeen front

Scottish walkies are not seen so often, but the trade was active there and this walking picture turned up recently, taken in Union Street, Aberdeen in September 1947, the details recorded on the back by one of the two women in the photograph. This suggests a local photographer making a living throughout the year, as it’s beyond any sort of holiday season (I have seen a Skegness walkies dated as late as October.) The road is the main shopping street in the town, and unwittingly the image gives a real insight into the bustling nature of the thoroughfare, with a horse and cart, cars, cycles and buses (there are tram tracks too) all passing the camera, and there is a slightly misty atmosphere to the photo which I like. Although people on holiday might have expected to be photographed in the street, the look of puzzlement particularly in the lady on the right suggests this was not the case here.

Union Street Aberdeen

The view is still very recognisable today in the shot above although the cobbles have gone and it is hard to replicate the foreshortening in the original image. The two women are just passing what is still Jamieson & Carry’s jewellery shop on the left (the firm have been on this site since 1925 although that’s a fairly recent move, they were established in 1733!).

Frustratingly there are no photographer details on the back beyond the ubiquitous frame number. The only other firm I know operating in the town was Movie Snaps, who also took smaller walkies here and in other Scottish locations in the late 1930s but seem to have closed when the War started.

 


Annie’s Mum

Worthing-for-blog

Whilst my main interest is in the images, walking picture research on this site is providing information for family tree researchers, and we do get quite a few requests for help in identifying unknown walkies which we can sometimes solve. This walking picture is a case in point, sent to me by Annie Goldsen. She knew it showed her mother Mary, the young girl in the centre (aged 7), as well as Mary’s parents (her Mum in the sun visor hat) and her Grandmother, but was keen to know where they were holidaying. It was taken around 1935, and they were clearly off to the beach for a spot of cricket.
I like a challenge; at first I thought it might be Skegness as the white block building was quite like some buildings there, but I drew a blank. In the end it needed a potter through my archives from A – Z, and a match finally turned up in Worthing.
The postcard view below shows the exact spot the family were when the photographer pressed the shutter. The building in the background is amazingly still there, a sort of shelter, changing room and shop combined. Even the buses in the view match.
The walkie would have been one of a strip of three, the reference number is hand-written sideways down the frame edge.
It’s a lovely image, they all seem really happy and having seen him in advance smile for the photographer.
There are quite a few more Worthing walkies on the site if you use the search button.

Worthing-promenade


Benson’s Scarborough

Scarborough-Bensons, Sandside, Harbour, walking picture

John Lawson sent me this example of a Benson’s walkie recently, which we suggest dates from around 1962.  The walkie shows John’s Great Grandparents William and Jane Wandless and was taken on Sandside next to the harbour in Scarborough, Benson’s usual beat.  There are more details of Benson’s Scarborough walking pictures business on the site and the firm also operated in Bridlington.  Looking again at the examples I have, it is possible that  Benson numbered their cards continuously over the years, as they are numbered from 7000 or so up to 50000+.  It would be a great way to help date them if so and also shows us that the firm took over 50,000 photographs during their tenure.

Scarborough-Bensons, Sandside, Harbour, walking picture