walking picture

Miss Bradbury walks

Miss Bradbury, Scarborough Sandside, walking picture 1930s

Back to Miss Bradbury!  We posted a cut-out walkie with her on here recently. Going through her snapshots a number of walkies emerged, and seem to cover both her and her husband’s holidays over a twenty year period or more. Here are three more. I might have assumed the first to be just a family snapshot except it has the ‘Walking Picture’ backprint. It looks to be late Thirties to me, the dress pattern on what I assume to be proud Mum is very vivid, and it probably qualifies more as a just learned to walkie! The location didn’t have many clues but I thought the arched gable on the right looked like it might be by Scarborough harbour and so it proved (see the then and now below!). This location at Sandside was popular with walkie photographers and Miss Bradbury was snapped here as a teenager in the walkie below.

Miss Bradbury, Blackpool Central pier, 1950 walking picture

Walkie two was taken on Blackpool Central Pier in the late Forties. The V1 display which featured on the pier just after the war (which can be seen on the site) has gone but the Bicycle ride is still there. This is a busy walkie scene; Miss Bradbury and her father are walking toward the cameraman, but you can see a queue of people behind them waiting their turn.

Miss Bradbury, Blackpool Central pier, 1950s, walking picture

Lastly Miss Bradbury is back in Blackpool for walkie three, this time the North Pier, but with her boyfriend (or perhaps by now her husband) on her right (Uncle on her left?) rather than her parents. She also has a box camera of some sort with her and the patterned frock suggests early Fifties.

Scarborough harbour

Sandside then and now


Miss Bradbury

Miss Bradbury, Scarborough

This unusual walkie came amongst a clutch of snapshots I purchased at the local flea market last week.  There was an entire box full of photographs from a house clearance, all from the same family, but very little to identify them.  My guess is the teenager in the middle is a Miss Bradbury, flanked by her parents.  It looks like she cut their heads out to mount into some sort of oval frame, but kept the rest of the print.  The Bradbury’s lived in the Huddersfield area – all the snapshot wallets were from the town – and holidayed across the UK.  On this occasion it was Scarborough, where they were snapped by a walkie photographer down by the harbour at a place known as Sandside (which has featured here before) probably in the early Fifties.


Wardoura walkie

I posted these walkies some months ago, which remain a mystery – nobody so far seems to know where Wardoura Motion Pictures operated. Anyhow, I have had a go at animating the two strips to bring them to life a little and give us an idea of the camera operator at work. You can see the original post on the site.

Wardoura Motion pictures

Wardoura Motion pictures


Walkie trio

Three women walking in high street 1938

This great walkie catches three women on a morning’s shopping expedition, though we don’t know where, as there is simply not enough clues in the photograph.  That seems to be a biggish department store they’re striding past, and we can date it to 1938 as one of them has written it on the back, with two names, Marjorie Nilson and Violet Sawyer.  The other woman is simply identified as a “lady friend”.  I assume that’s Violet in the centre, with the hard to miss V patterned dress.
A postcard sized print, and no firm named on the back, the three have clearly just spotted the camera in time to smile, but otherwise it’s a very typical unposed walkie portrait.


Sunny Snaps again

One consequence of the Walking Pictures project has been people sending in scans, wanting to know where they were taken.  And while I have 101 other things I ought to be doing, I can’t resist a challenge.  It’s as well Google don’t charge for their street view by the hour (but then given the tax they dodge, free is the least they can do!).

sunny-snaps-peter-aylett-and-friend

This walkie by the firm of Sunny Snaps arrived recently, sent by Peter Aylett in California. It is very typical of their output, well composed and very naturalistic.  It shows his father Jim on the right, looking very dapper in his pale suit, with an unknown friend (taken around mid-day in April.) Sunny Snaps have dated this one, 1939, but not given the location, and Peter was hoping we might be able to help.
My initial thought was that this was unlikely to be a coastal Sunny Snaps walkie, but more likely to be back in London, their other main area of operation. The railway bridge was a clue, and the buildings very distinctive, but London has an awful lot of these.

shepherds-bush-section

uxbridge-road-today

From what little I know of Sunny Snaps in the city, Fulham High Street seemed a good starting point, but while a rail bridge and church there matched quite well, the buildings were not quite right.  Having trawled around on street view, I gave up and went in search of an Underground rail enthusiast site and discovered District Dave’s London Underground forum (http://districtdave.proboards.com/). Their moderator Rich kindly posted the scan and within a few hours John Tuthill had recognised the scene as Shepherd’s Bush Market station on Uxbridge Road in London.
Many of the buildings have gone but he spotted the end of the Passmore Edwards library (now closed and replaced by a modern library, but hopefully opening as a theatre before long) just to the left of the fly postered telegraph pole.  The bridge matches, but I could not see the church in the present day scene. John explained that the spire had been removed a few years later. The bus in the background is a new trolleybus, which had replaced the trams on this road only two years earlier.

From Astrop Terrace to Uxbridge Road, Shepherds Bush, London

Peter has tracked the path Jim would have taken that day in 1939 from the family home on Astrop Terrace to the point where the Sunny Snaps was taken.

This is a useful addition to the story of Sunny Snaps, who we are beginning to think had a number of photographers out and about in London in the late Thirties as well as the South Coast towns. Quite often photographers worked near their base, and incredibly the yellow fronted shop in the modern view is currently a branch of … Snappy Snaps!

grandma-smith

Our second example was taken the same year, and shows Johnny Smith’s Grandmother, again photographed in London, and looking smartly dressed for a shopping trip. She lived on Battersea Rise near Clapham Junction in 1939 and this may have been taken on that road (or St. Johns Wood High Street which crosses it), which was (and still is) a busy shopping area, although I have not been able to make a match with the surviving streetscape yet. If anyone spots something they recognise, please let us know. That might be some sort of street market going on in the background.

You can read more about Sunny Snaps on the site, and there is another London walkie there.  If anyone has further examples please get in touch. You can also join a newsletter service about the forthcoming book, which will keep you updated on progress and details of any pre-publication offers. This service is provided by the book’s publishers.  Your details will be kept confidential and you can unsubscribe at any time.  Click the button below for details:

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Movember 1908

Couple-1908.jpg

I’m not sure where this ‘Movember’ craze all began but scanning this photograph the other day I felt it more than fitted the theme.
This Edwardian portrait was taken in Folkestone in August 1908, probably at a cheap indoor seaside photograph studio. The lady has moved slightly during the exposure (there don’t appear to be any clamps for holding heads straight in the studio) and is a little out of focus as a result, but the resulting image has a nice relaxed feel to it.  The gentleman in particular, with his waxed moustache, loose (and very short, but still clipped in place) tie, and cap seems very at ease. You can imagine him setting off for a cycle ride dressed like this.
The couple also had a sense of humour, one of them has written “Types of English beauty!” on the back before sending it to friends or family.
The print has been processed quite quickly, you can see the fingerprints of the darkroom assistant in some places where he or she hasn’t washed all the chemical off their hands. I do like the slightly impressionistic flower backdrop being used too.


24 frames a second (2)

bournemouth 1933 walking picture

I’ve not been able to resist having a go at animating one of the strip walkies myself.  I decided to use a rare strip of four, as this gives a little more movement, to start with. The occasion was a holiday in Bournemouth in September 1933, and the couple in the walkie strip are Charles Hallam Payne (1870-1960) and his wife Sarah Emma née Parker (1870-1946).  The scans were sent to me by Brett Payne in New Zealand from the collection of Barbara Ellison; Charles was his Great Great Uncle. Charles inherited some property and was able to retire early, and from their Derbyshire home the couple took regular holidays, favouring Bournemouth and Great Yarmouth, and assembled a collection of walkie postcards and some strips.
I made an effort to match the frames by layering them together and adjusting as far as possible, but there is still a little distortion caused I assume by movement of the camera (even though it was on a tripod) while it was being cranked. Nevertheless it does give a real feel for the walkie experience.
Brett is another one fascinated by vintage photographs and writes a regular feature on the at  http://photo-sleuth.blogspot.com

The first walkie animation is below


Blackpool but where?

Blackpool 1950 honeymoon

This walkie was sent by Christine Edwards who is trying to find the exact location. It shows her parents Don and Kath on their honeymoon in Blackpool in August 1950 (one of them has written the information on the back), dressed in the outfits they were married in. The couple look very happy, and were together for over sixty years.
I sent the image to the Blackpool local studies people who have been able to help in the past, but they drew a blank on this one. I have had a look on street view and cannot spot it either although it does have the look of one of the streets which run down to the promenade.  Of course it is possible the block in the background has been redeveloped since the Fifties. Some nice vintage adverts on the end of the wall too.
The walkie firm is unidentified and the photo is a little out of focus, suggesting perhaps a less experienced photographer having a try at the business (the paper is ex-War surplus.)
I will pass any information on to Christine.


Going places

two girls walking twenties whitley bay

This trio of walkies all turned up recently, and all capture two female friends or relatives out shopping by the looks of it.  None are identified as yet but the first one has a horse drawn laundry van with ‘Provincial Laundry Whitley Bay’ on the side which suggests the town itself or one nearby. The two younger women are just stepping into the camera range, but the rest of the three frames are lost.

two girls walking twenties

Similarly walking as if they mean it, the next two women may be mother and daughter, she seems very amused to be photographed. I like the idler resting against the lamp post in his Oxford Bags, watching what’s going on. It’s possible he sneaked into a whole set of that morning’s walkies!

two women walking down street twenties

Lastly another mother and daughter by the looks of it, both fairly laden from a shopping trip down what looks like a busy street.  The woman on the right has just blinked as the shutter clicked! I always associate those wooden garden fencing panels with the concave centres with the seaside, having often dragged sticks or spades along them to make a racket as a child in Bridlington.
As always if anybody recognises the views do get in touch.